Insights into Building a Site from Scratch: Round Four

So, I have been building a new site for my new employer, and I am learning lots as well as coming across various issues that have slowed my progress down.

In the first post, Insights into Building a Site from Scratch, I mentioned that I was having some issues with WordPress, and so in the second post, Round Two, I talked about that. The Round Three post was primarily about hosting issues, and the slow downs that the site was having.

Today, I want to talk about data entry as I am slowly but surely entering in the data needed by the site to be a resource and be successful. Usually, I build blogs where the content builds over time, but this time, in building a site, I need a wide base of content that the blog will be referencing, linking to and promoting.

Getting the data on the site has been a bit frustrating as much of it is similar in nature, and so the repetition is quickly tiring me out. It kills my focus to do the same thing ten or twenty times. I feel like I am working on a conveyer belt, grabbing information and moving it from one spot, to another.

I understand that every project has its boring part, but usually it is quickly over and I am able to move on to the more entertaining and challenging aspects. This project has me working on the boring part for quite some time.

To keep my sanity, I only give the boring part so much effort before working on other elements of the site. I am still organizing plugins, and their settings, as well as thinking about the big picture and how it is all going to come together in a useable and helpful way.

Recently, my boss mentioned that he didn’t like the search results that WordPress provides, and so I am going to do some tweaking based on suggestions by Joost de Valk’s article, Make WordPress’ search suck less.

One thought on “Insights into Building a Site from Scratch: Round Four

  1. Ryan Caldwell

    David, the solution is to break the project into fun and not-fun parts. Commit to doing 2-3 hours per day of the not-fun parts, and 5-6 hrs per day of the fun parts.

    The nice thing about the web is that it doesn’t require a finished product. I would recommend optimizing your time by optimizing between your natural interests and the necessary drudgery. Rather than trying to do all the drudgery upfront.

    I find that Google’s concept of organized chaos works well here.

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